Rose Tree Kids

Rose Tree Kids
Making your visit personalized and fun for your child!

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Anxiety Free Dental Treatment


Nothing makes me happier than to tell a patient of mine that they are in this months “No Cavity Club!” They are either getting great guidance at home, eating a healthy low-sugar diet, listening to the education I provide, or hopefully, all of the above! 
However, there are times that cavities or other dental issues are found and need to be treated. Most children are comfortable and calm in the office and during procedures. Children’s offices are designed to make them feel that way - bright colors, toys, their favorite music of movie for entertainment. Also, we chose to work specifically with children and want to cater to their special needs. 

There are times, however, that children are anxious before treatment. When the anxiety could prevent adequate treatment, Nitrous oxide/oxygen can be used to help relax the child and ease their anxieties or fears. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is also a great option for children that have a severe gag reflex that interferes with treatment. 

What is Nitrous oxide/oxygen?
Nitrous oxide/oxygen, also known as “laughing gas”, is a blend of oxygen and nitrous oxide that is used as a safe sedative. A mask is placed over the nose for the child to inhale the gentle gases by breathing normally. It is used for the duration of the treatment and then eliminated after a short period of breathing oxygen. There are no lingering effect of this treatment and children are able to go to school after. 

What does Nitrous oxide/oxygen feel like?
It has a faint, sweet aroma. It gives a sense of relaxation and well-being. Our bodies have a threshold of pain that they can tolerate and nitrous oxide/oxygen raises this threshold. Many people know this mixture of gases as “laughing gas” due to it sometimes causing giddiness. At the end of the procedure, when the oxygen is being breathed in and removing the effects of the nitrous oxide, these sensations dissipate and the child will being to feel “normal” again. 

Is it safe?
Our goal while treating your children is to give them the best treatment we can. That includes keeping them safe, comfortable, and happy. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is very safe. It is perhaps the safest form of sedation in dentistry. 
  • Children tolerate it well. 
  • It takes just minutes to become effective. 
  • Completely reversible. 
  • Non-allergenic.
  • Child remains fully conscious and is able to respond to questions or requests. 

If your office recommends Nitrous oxide/oxygen for your child’s dental treatment there are a few things to keep in mind. Give them only a light meal in the hours leading up to an appointment. Sometimes children can feel nauseous or experience vomiting if they have a full stomach. Also, make sure that their medical history is up-to-date and you have disclosed and respiratory conditions or anything else that could make nasal breathing difficult. This could limit the effectiveness of nitrous oxide/oxygen. Keeping their medical history up-to-date includes letting the dentist know if there are any new medications or any medications that were taken the day of treatment. 

At Rose Tree Kids we always provide one-on-one treatment that is specially designed for your child's needs. Every service should be fitting to your child as an individual. Always speak with the dentist/hygienist about your child’s special needs so we can treat them to the best of our ability. This includes Nitrous oxide/oxygen. There may be times when it isn’t the best option for your child. Their dentist will review the medical history, their level of anxiety, and any other issues to determine if this is the best treatment for them. 


Any Questions? 

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And remember the Candy Buy Back <--- Click to learn more!! What to do with all the candy after Halloween, bless the troops! 



Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Running update

I just read a pin on Pinerest (feel free to follow me!)

Running is not about being better than someone else, it's about being better than you used to be.  

As someone who used to run competitively, this is a hard adjustment to make...but one I'm working on.  I don't have the time & if we're being really honest, I don't feel like getting back into running with so much intensity. My knees were bothering me 2 weeks ago, so I took a break & didn't run for 10 days, but I got back on the horse & yesterday did an easy 6 mile run.  I don't need to be first or have an 5 minute mile (though I'd probably run farther if that was the case) I just need to go the distance, farther & with less pain than before.  I'm actually beginning to enjoy running again, which to me is a huge accomplishment!

I'm signed up for two races coming up...if anyone is interested in joining me!

First, I'll be running The Fueled Up and Fired Up 5K Challenge is, again the Pick 5 Challenge! 5K or 5 Miles! This Saturday in Wallingford. Race benefits the Nether Providence Township First Responders and Susan G. Komen Philadelphia. Info can be found HERE on Run the Day.

Then I'm running the 37th Annual Penn Medicine Radnor Run, on Sunday, October 26th 2014. The morning’s main event, led by our Celebrity Chair, ABC Action News Meteorologist Cecily Tynan, is a 5-Mile USA Track & Field sanctioned and certified race through the surrounding scenic Radnor neighborhood.  The event also includes an untimed 1-Mile Fun Run/Walk for adults and youth of all ages. Bring the family! For more information and to sign up, please visit www.lunginfo.org/radnorrun


Candy Buy Back with Operation Gratitude!


I love candy. 
Love it. 
In fact, I specifically love the candy that I tell all of your children to stay away from most. That colorful, fruity, chewy, sticky, sweetness. Mike&Ikes, Starburst, jelly beans, Skittles, Swedish Fish. Sure, I like chocolate, but that sugary goo gets me every time. 
When I was a kid I didn’t even like chocolate. I know, I know... 
I didn’t like it until after I was married. So when it came to Halloween night, I had the best for bartering candy. All of my chocolate for whatever fruity candy you got. Like most families, I am sure, we dumped our goods at the end of the night and started trading right away. 
Who got the most?
Who got what?
Mom is gonna steal your Mallow Cups! 
And we always got double the sweets. After a round in our neighborhood we would head home, dump those pillowcases, change costumes, and head back out for round two. I am not saying it was right, but it was fun! I am pretty certain our neighbors new what was up. They just loved my dad so we got away with it. :)
Oh, Halloween, how I loved you. That might have been one of the most exciting nights of the year. I remember many Halloweens vividly. However, I don’t remember the days after Halloween. I remember bringing some candy to school, but I don’t remember going crazy eating tons of candy in the days to follow. Maybe I did and its the sugar comas that cloud my memory. Or maybe my parents hid most of it from us so we wouldn’t go insane. Or they ate it themselves....

Fast forward to many years later where I am a dental hygienist working with children, telling dozens of them a day to watch the sugar they eat. Candy is a “bad treat” and apples and blueberries are “good treats.” Given the choice between chocolate or candy as a healthier alternative, choose chocolate every time (except chocolate milk!) They start telling me what they love and I am mentally drooling. I couldn’t deprive them of their happiness. So, little Jimmy, save those sweets for the special occasions - birthday parties, holidays, and Halloween! 

What’s a parent to do? How can you simply take all of their candy away? 

There are certain things you can do to encourage them to give their candy away. 
One way is to bring the candy to our office the week following Halloween. We are teaming up with a nonprofit organization called Operation Gratitude. We will collect all the candy you wish to donate and Operation Gratitude will help us send it overseas to our soldiers. 

How it works:
Your child brings in a Ziploc Gallon sized bag filled with candy and they get $2. A half gallon bag gets $1. Then we weigh it. After the week is over, whoever brought the most will win a prize! 

We encourage children to write, color, or draw thank you cards. The troops really love this! 

There are many ways to give your candy to a cause that teaches your children kindness, gratitude, and appreciation. What could be harder for a child than to give away all that candy they worked for to a good cause?

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to get the following:

  • Keep up with our candy collection
  • See when we are collecting
  • See how much we end up sending overseas
  • Read some of the awesome Thank You cards we receive 
  • Find out who our winner is!

Rose Tree Kids Dental office hours are 
Monday 9-6
Wednesday 8-5
Friday 8-12

Saturday 10-12 We are not open on Saturdays, however, we will be there November 8th to finish collecting the candy.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Let's Talk Nutrition!


Did you know that the bacteria in your mouth loves to eat carbs and sugar just as much as you? It absolutely does. 

And after it eats, the bacteria and its waste product stick to your teeth in a very filmy substance known as plaque. 
Since children aren’t familiar with the term “waste product” and I always try to speak in a way that resonates with them, I tell them that plaque is bateria poo. This is usually followed by a creeped out face and a loud “Ewww!” Which makes me happy. 
Telling some children why will sometimes help motivate them to do an action since they now have understanding. Our goal is to get your kids brushing. 

What can you do for that child who refuses to brush properly?
Aside from being consitant and leading by example, there is something else you can do. Help cut back on the amount of plaque that accumulates in their mouth. 
While all foods have at least small amounts of sugar in them, there are certain things that can create a worse enviroment. 
For instance, have you ever noticed that at the end of a day spent eating sugary foods (think of a birthday party) you seem to have “fuzzier” teeth than normal and a strong desire to brush. Ok, maybe the strong desire to brush just effects a crazy dental hygienist like me, but you see where I am going with this. 
So, let’s discuss the foods that make your oral health worse.  



Foods and Beverages that Contribute to Poor Oral Health
The more often you eat, and the longer foods are in your mouth, the more potential damage to your teeth can occur. You can acutally cause more damage by eating from a large bag of M&M’s throughout the day than eating the entire bag in one sitting. That doens’t mean eat the whole bag! But your mouth needs some time to recover and return to the original, healthy pH that prevents decay. Some foods, in particular, are more likely to cause oral health problems than others. Therefore, practice moderation if and when you or your child consume the following foods:
Carbohydrates: Refined carbohydrate-laden foods (chips, bread, pasta, crackers, etc.) can be as harsh on your teeth as candy. Bacteria feed on leftover food particles in the mouth and produce an acidic waste product, which causes decay.
Chewy, sticky foods: Raisins, granola bars, jellybeans, caramel, honey and syrup stick to teeth, making it hard for saliva to wash away their sugar, which can cause tooth decay.
Sugary snacks: Snacks like cookies, cakes or other sweet treats contain a high amount of cavity-causing sugar.
Candy and gum: Eating candy and chewing regular sugar sweetened gum are harmful to your teeth. As you eat, sugar coats your teeth, which can lead to cavities. There are many types of gums now that have Xylitol as a sweetener which helps prevent decay. 
Carbonated soft drinks: Regular soda contains a high amount of sugar. Both regular and diet sodas also contain phosphorous and carbonation that wear away tooth enamel.
Fruit and vegetable juices: Fruit and vegetable juices tend to be high in sugar and very acidic and can damage tooth enamel and lead to decay.
Sports drinks: Sports drinks, which I discussed in a previous post HERE, can be high in sugar and highly acidc, causing decay. 
Acidic foods and beverages: Acids, which can cause dental erosion, are found in numerous foods and drinks. These acids include:
  • Phosphoric acid, which is found in soft drinks
  • Citric and malic acids, which are found in fruits such as lemons and fruit products
  • Lactic acid, which can be found in fermented products, such as yogurt
  • Tartaric acid, which is found in grapes and wines


So, it is unlikely that you will just cut all of these right out of you and your families diet. Making sure that they are consumed in moderation will help cut back. Also, increasing water intake and specifically while eating these food items will help cut back on plaque build up. 

Remember to always honeslty discuss diet with your childs dental hygienist/dentist. Knowing what they are consuiming can help us treat them properly! 

Are you now thinking "What the heck are we going to do about all of that Halloween candy that we will be getting soon?!" Don't fret friends, I'll be posting about that soon! 

Keep those teeth healthy and keep smiling!

As always, feel free to ask questions. 

I would love to hear from my readers! 
How old are your children? 
What dental or nutritional concerns do you have?
Any questions you forgot to ask at your last dental visit?
Let me know and I'll answer them. 

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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

"I Want To Be Cavity Free!"


                            
By Ashley Valco


I wish all my kids walked into my office yelling this! 

Last week I posted about your little one’s teeth wiggling out. -------->
Check it out HERE if you missed it. 
While those first baby teeth are movin’ on out to make room for the adult front teeth, your child could already have their first adult molars. Between the ages of 6 and 7 years old the first adult molars begin to make their appearance. These molars, just like every other adult tooth, should hang around for the rest of their life. So that is where sealants come into play. 

Run your tongue along the biting surface of all your molars. If you do not have crowns or fillings on them you will feel many grooves and pits. They come in all shapes and sizes and are difficult to keep clean. Your tooth brush bristles aren’t able to get into those grooves as well as we would like. Food and bacteria build up in these crevices, which puts your child in danger of tooth decay. This specific area is the most common area for children to get cavities.

So what exactly is a sealant?
Sealant material is made of a tooth colored plastic that is applied to the biting surface of molars. It is a noninvasive treatment that helps keep teeth cavity-free. 

What is treatment like?
The process of having sealants applied is completed in one visit and is comfortable and quick. The tooth is cleaned of any food debris and bacteria, then conditioned and dried. The sealant material is squeezed out of a tube into the grooves of the tooth. It flows right in and fills all the grooves smoothly. A little light shined on the tooth will harden it. Your child will be able to eat right after the appointment. 
You can see those tiny grooves are now nice and smooth and can be easily cleaned. 

Which teeth should be sealed?
The teeth that have the highest risk of decay and can benefit from sealants are the first and second molars (aka 6 year molars and 12 year molars). There may be other teeth, such as permanent premolars or other teeth with deep grooves, that could benefit as well. This is why it is best to go to a dental practice that treats your child as an individual with one-on-one treatment so you know that you are getting the best for your child. 

What will it cost?

Sealant treatment is very affordable when you consider how much cavities will cost; time in the office, your child’s experience, and financial burden. Many insurance companies will cover sealants. Check with your insurance company and your dental office to see what is covered and if there are any restrictions. 

Contact us if you have any questions! 

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Things to do... Weekend 9/27


Things to do the weekend of September 26-28
Click event for more information


Saturday 9/27


Sunday 9/28





"Arkansas Black apples" by Gphoto - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arkansas_Black_apples.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Arkansas_Black_apples.jpg

Thirty-One Giveaway! ENTER HERE!!!!






a Rafflecopter giveaway

Watch for Delaware County Moms and Laura's 31 Product Giveaway will begin today!





Laura is a SAHM of two awesome kids and a Senior Director with Thirty-One Gifts. Prior to joining Thirty-One, she worked in business development and marketing for Christiana Mall. Becoming a part of a direct sales team enabled her to continue her love of social marketing, spend more time with her family, and schedule that all important GIRL TIME FUN that we all need!!  Through Thirty-One she donated 31 thermal totes to the mothers of children at the Ronald McDonald House in DE last Mother’s Day. She looks forward to venturing more into projects where she can lift the spirits of people and their communities.

As many of you already know it is childhood cancer awareness month.  Laura is AMAZING and letting us giveaway off a very popular 31 product to continue to bring awareness to childhood cancer.  Check it out!  Thanks Laura!  



Tuesday, September 23, 2014

"Mom! My Tooth Fell Out!"

  

This weekend my friends son lost his first tooth! 

I personally love when kids come into my office thrilled that they have lost or have a wiggly tooth. Maybe it is just my passion for teeth, or my weird obsession with the tooth fairy. I guess it is really both! Either way, it is milestone for your little one. 

The first teeth to become loose are generally the front bottom two (lower central incisors). They begin to wiggle once the adult tooth beneath it starts to apply pressure to make its way into that spot. This can happen as early as age 4 or as late as age 7, however, it generally happens around age 5 to 6. 

When the teeth become mobile it is a good idea to encourage them to wiggle it. Most children are excited for this process to begin, and even more for the visit from the tooth fairy! If your child is a worrier, they may be apprehensive and think it could be painful. You can reassure them that they are likely to not feel a thing. 

It is important to remind your kids to continue brushing the tooth that is loose. Many times children avoid that wiggly tooth because it may feel strange to brush. By avoiding it, plaque builds up around it and beneath it and can effect the adult tooth below.

When the new teeth emerge there are two things every parent always asks: 
“Why are they so big?” and
“Why are they so yellow?”
Baby teeth are much smaller and whiter than adult teeth. Therefore, when adult teeth come in, they look very yellow and large in comparison. As the rest of the baby teeth fall out over the next 6 years, you will see the teeth begin to look a “normal” shade and size.  

Around the time of the loss of those front teeth, your child’s first adult molars (6 year molars) will begin to appear. They are all the way in the back of the mouth, behind the baby molars. Once they are fully erupted, their dental hygienist/dentist will recommend Sealants. Check out my coming post that will cover everything you need to know about Sealants! 

Finally, the other question that comes up most when children lose their first tooth, 
“What is the going rate these days from the tooth fairy?”
I have heard everything from $1 to $20 to a new toy! It seems to me that $5 is the most common. 

What have you given or plan to give? What are your tooth fairy traditions? I would love to hear from you! 










Friday, September 19, 2014

I Walk For Katie

Katie


I walk for Katie. 

As you know from Rebecca’s recent post about childhood cancer, September is childhood cancer awareness month. Every September in Boston, they hold the Boston Marathon® Jimmy Fund Walk. 

This is something that is close to my heart. 

This walk raises the most money for a single-day walk in the nation and has raised nearly $95 million for the fight against cancer since 1989. It fundraises for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s lifesaving mission to conquer all forms of cancer in children and adults.
This is the foundation that helped my cousin Katie during her battle with cancer.
Katie and the best dog around, Cocoa





So, on September 21, 2014 I will be walking 26.2 miles for Katie. 

Katie suffered from two-forms of cancer simultaneously: a germ-cell cancer called “immature teratoma,” and another virulent strain known as PNET (primitive neuroectodermal tumor), which essentially feeds off the teratoma and grows at a rapid rate.
The Jimmy Fund treated her for 15 months during her battle...

Katie and I 
My beautiful cousin loved the color purple. 
She loved to dance. 
She loved school. 
She touched everyone’s lives. 

This is a great organization that is at the forefront against cancer. I am honored to walk with “Katie’s Keepers” and raise money to help everyone whose lives (young and old) have been effected by cancer.  
Katie's best Keepers - her mom and sisters

Please help Katie’s Keepers and The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute by donating to my page. 

Click the Link Below to check out my personal page and donate. Every dollar helps! 



Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Youth Athlete & The Mouth Guard


Fall is here and school is in session, as well as sports!
For most of you sports parents, the fall also brings after school practices, busy sports schedules, and crisp Saturday mornings in the stands with a hot cup of coffee in your hands. 

What you may not be thinking about is your little athletes face and jaw protection.   
How many of your kids play sports and do not wear a mouth guard? It may seem unimportant, however, it can protect them from serious injury. 

More kids than ever are participating in competitive sports and with that is an increase of injury. The American Dental Association reports that 36% of all unintentional injuries involving youth are sports related and of that, 20% are maxillofacial (jaw and face) injuries. That is startling. 

What can you do to protect your children during games? 
It is a simple answer: have them wear a mouth guard while playing sports. 

What is a mouth guard?
A mouth guard is made of a laminate material or soft plastic. They are worn during sports for maxillofacial protection. 

What does a mouth guard do?
They help prevent injuries that can happen during sports. They help prevent injuries to the mouth, teeth, tongue, cheeks, and jaw. They also protect against injuries to the head and neck. A mouth guard will cushion blows that could potentially cause concussions or jaw fractures. 


Those in orthodontic treatment should especially wear mouth guards for even lower contact sports to prevent damage to their lips from the brackets.

What kind of mouth guard is best?
Definitely bring this up with your dentist. She will discuss all the options available from custom-made guards to the over-the-counter kind you can find at sporting goods stores. 
There are plenty of options. Depending on your child's specific needs, you can get the best recommendation from your dentist. 


When it comes to your youth athlete, remember that they are still growing! Changes to their teeth, mouth, and jaw will happen over time. Be sure to visit your dentist regularly and bring the mouth guard along. A dentist can evaluate the guard and will be able to ensure it is still fitting properly. 
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